How to start a poultry farm and make profit!

How to start a poultry farm and make profit!

This is a topic that is close to my heart because I grew up on a mini animal farm. As a teenager, I raised Chickens, Goats, Dogs, Rabbits, Ducks and even 1 cat. However, this article is focused on how to start a poultry farm.

Why is a Poultry farm a viable idea?

  • With 170 million Nigerians who need to eat, the market potential for poultry products is big.
  • Another advantage is that chickens mature faster than many other animals like goats, cows. A chicken can be ready for sales in about 16 weeks (the broilers).
  • You can earn in multiple ways from a poultry- you can sell the eggs whilst the chicken is still laying. When the chicken becomes old, you can sell the old layers for consumption, you can sell the waste product from the poultry- excreta to fish pond owners as feed or to farmers as manure.

How to start:

1st step is to really take time to understand the farming and the business aspect of poultry farming.

The farming side includes:

  1. Understand what type of chicken do you want to invest in. There are 2 popular ones in Nigeria: the broilers and the layers. The broilers (mainly cross breeds and are white coloured) are specially bred for fast growth whilst the layers (mostly brown or black coloured) are those that can lay eggs and mature for sales after a while. The broilers are mature for sales after about 12-16 weeks of adequate care. The layers start laying eggs as from 20 weeks till about 12-15 months. When they stop laying, they can be sold as old layers. You can easily tell the difference as the broilers look like ‘butter pikin’ and the layers look more ‘rugged’. On a lighter note, one thing is common though, both of them have a mean peck.

compare-broiler-vs-layer-birds-difference-pictures

  1. Understand what phase of the poultry life cycle you want to start.  You need to know if you want to buy the ready to hatch eggs, incubate them and raise the chicks from 1 day old chicks to adulthood. An alternative is to buy older chicks- about 8 weeks old from another farmer who specializes in incubating chicks. I advise new farmers to buy older chicks because incubating chicks is similar to caring for newly born babies. They need a lot of care- right room temperature, right lighting, prevent stampede, right feeding, right cleaning and more. Phew! They are fragile. chicks
  1. Make a decision how to raise the chickens: Many prefer the deep litter method versus the cage system because it is less capital intensive and easy to clean.  However both have their advantages and disadvantages.  The deep litter method is when the chickens are allowed to roam within a large space almost in a natural manner. Many farmers leave saw dust on the ground so it can absorb the waste droppings from the chicken. The main disadvantage is that it is more difficult to pick the eggs and there is a higher chance of ‘chicken fight’ over food and water which in turn affects the productivity of the chickens. The battery system is more structured, the eggs can be easily picked up, there is better distribution of food and water however it needs higher capital for the cages and is a bit more difficult to clean.

 deep litter cage

  1. Learn how to take care of the chickens: Before you start. Note I said before you start. You must learn how to raise them. What kind of feed they will have, what types of vaccines they need, which vet doctor can attend to them in case of emergencies, how to prevent predators! Yes, they will come; snakes, soldier ants, rats and more especially if your location is close to water source such as streams or rivers.
  1. Identify your team: Very crucial, raising chickens is a full day job. They need to be fed 2-3 times daily. They don’t understand you are stuck in traffic and cannot make their feeding time. They need to be given clean water daily, they need their cages to be cleaned, they need eggs to be picked daily. You need a committed staff to help depending on the poultry size.

Exciting, isn’t it! Please, watch out for the next episode on the financial side of poultry management. Please, follow us to get details.  Drop questions or comments below.

Thanks and until then, stay financially wise.

Advertisements

31 comments

  1. Wao, very sharp and concise advise, for me i have always seen the potential but havent been able to make capture the financials well. Do you plan to do a follow up to this fine write up where you will help capture the cost of running this a poultry with the possibility of scaling up? I will like to know what the profit margins will look like with a poultry before investing. Impressive blog and very educative, was sent here by one of your biggest fans @enginedare

    Liked by 1 person

  2. This is what I want settle down doing with Pig rearing. Although, I have started it in a very small way with 15 broilers, I intends to grow the population when am able to secure a more spacious place.

    I am very happy to come across your article on this very subject as I have been looking and searching for instructors even on google.

    I will be very happy if you could be my instructor and teacher. Please, when is broiler reap enough for sales in terms of months, I have been keeping mine for three months and they are big and heavy.

    Thanks for the useful and insightful topic.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hello Joshua, happy to read you are trying poultry farming out already. I can instruct and teach you as much as i can online. Just drop an email on tolutoms@gmail.com. On the broilers maturity, they are actually ripe for sales from about 12-16 weeks so at about 3-4 months. Before you sell, go to the markets and inquire how much they are currently selling for so you get a good price for them.

      Like

  3. Thanks for this lecture. Which , between poultry and fish farming, would you recommend in terms of costing, survival rate, maintenance and profitability especially for a beginner?

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hi Nasamu, both are viable businesses. I suggest you start really small scale on both to learn 1st hand. Start with 10 layers, 10 broilers and 20 fish fingerlings. A fingerling costs as low as N20 per one. Their feeding to maturity costs about N250 and you can raise these few in a small container. This way, you can decide for yourself based on your passion, available space and capital. Also, please follow our blog we will share another episode on poultry with details on financials. Then another on fish farming afterwards.

      Like

    • hello there, you can get the chick layers from farmers that raise them. You can go to renown farmers to inquire. Some even sell on social media. On pricing, a 16 weeks old chicken ranges from about N800-N1000, it depends on where you are buying from. They can lay eggs up to about 80 weeks so the money in poultry comes from the egg business. When you sell them as old layers, they go for about the same price of N1,000. For the broilers, its a bit different because the do not lay eggs so the profit comes from buying them as chicks and selling them at maturity. Please, follow the blog, we will do a second episode on financials next week. cheers.

      Like

  4. Thanks for the heart to share. Got it late though, but need to know more about starting small with fingerlings in a container as my space is small. Thanks ma

    Liked by 1 person

  5. thank you very much for this wonderful start up insight and advice, i am serving presently and have been researching hardly into agriculture and now i have decided to start fish farm and poultry farm very small scale. am a big fan of your blog and i have been reading you post deligently i have copied your email from recent comments and i would mail you for more enquires. this piece has been very helpful to me thank you.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. ‎‎Great post, keep it up

    To make a lot of profit in your Poultry farming business, you need to cut the cost of feeding your birds and birds grown at high densities requires a nutritionally complete feed to produce good growth and maintain good health. I’m a local manufacturer and distributor of high quality Poultry/catfish Feed in Nigeria. I sell at an affordable rate of N2,000 per 25kg bag, I have starter, Grower, Finisher and Layer Mash available. I distribute to all parts of the country to Sub-distributors, Wholesalers, Retailers and End-users.

    Feel free to call us on 08103953855. Our address is: No. 3, Okele Street, Ogbogbo, Ijebu North East, Ogun State, Nigeria. We offer free nationwide delivery.

    WE ALSO SELL:

    Fresh Crates of Egg–
    Big(N650), Medium(550).
    Day Old pullet–N250
    Day Old Broilers—N210
    Turkey Day Old(Foreign)—N1150
    Turkey Day Old (Local)—N750
    White Cockerel.–N75
    Black Cockerel.–N9100
    Pullet. —N400
    Parent Stock(broiler)—N2,500
    Parent Stock(Layers)—N2,800
    8Weeks Cockerel —-N900
    4Weeks Broiler—–N800
    10Weeks Broiler –N1500

    Types of Cages for Sale: Normal cage & Electric cage Feeds for Variety of Birds & many more.. Call 08103953855 to place an order and get Booked now. Days of Delivery: Monday-Saturday.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Good morning sir, thanks a lot for Di’s info and insight posted.I live in sango area. Pls people talks more on d risk involve in Di’s poulty business most especially layers. Does dat mean if we can keep two this 5 tips we can overcome the challenges involve totally?

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hello Olalekan, every business has risks and you cannot eliminate risks 100%. Yes, the tips will help but you also need to research about these risks in details to learn how to prevent practically. Big risks are 1. Disease/deaths… for this, you need a good vet doctor to monitor and advise and very close monitoring… 2) there is theft from staff or intruders…3) Predators: snakes, alligators, soldier ants.. for these, you need good pest control and monitoring…4) Low sales /eggs spoil after a while… e.t.c.. I agree they sound scary but they are surmountable. Good luck!

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s